Develop your learning objectives & design your training materials

Develop your learning objectives

The learning objectives are the starting point of the development of any learning activity. Learning objectives are a list of things the workers must be able to do after they have completed the training.

Once you’ve created your learning objectives, create content that covers the objectives. In addition, the following should assess only the workers’ understanding of the objectives performed during training to evaluate your workers’ comprehension of the training:

  • quizzes
  • tests
  • case studies
  • hands-on exercises

There are specific reasons why learning outcomes and objectives should be well thought through and clearly stated from the outset and before any design activities take place. These are:

  • Identifying outcomes is an effective way to review curriculum and content. This leads to a more balanced and well-sequenced curriculum.
  • It helps design appropriate assessment and evaluation tools that accurately reflect the curriculum.
  • By reviewing the needs assessment, trainers know what participants know and need, and the learning outcomes help inform everyone as to what new materials or skills they are intended to learn.
  • Trainers are able to evaluate the effectiveness of their teaching. Have the outcomes been achieved?
  • An instructional shift from teaching to learning is facilitated. The focus is on the learner rather than the trainer.
  • Participants will know exactly what they are expected to learn, thus avoiding ambiguity.
  • If you build participant learning assessments into the training, participants will know exactly how their learning will be assessed.
  • Participants begin to take more responsibility for their own learning when they know what they are expected to do and what standard they are expected to achieve.

Design your training materials

There are four major steps to any training design process:

STEP 1: It is much better to sketch out the whole curriculum before going into the specifics. Think about the big picture:

  • What is the major aim of the training?
  • What is it trying to achieve? WRITE a goal or aim statement. This should be a broad, general statement, such as; participants will be able to understand the importance of disaster risk reduction along side preparedness and response.

STEP 2: CONSIDER the overall scope of training. Specify the major topics or sections of the training by brainstorming (with others) and making a list.

  • What sort of things do we want the participants to learn? At this level the outcome statements will be quite broad referring to such areas that cover the whole subject. For example: It is anticipated that participants who successfully complete the training will be able to:
  1. Establish a common understanding of the tenets on which lie the foundations of disaster risk reduction (DRR).
  2.  Develop a better understanding of preparedness, response and recovery as integral to disaster risk reduction.
  3. Illustrate the role of different stakeholders in DRR, the integrated nature between the sectors in DRR and the importance of coordination between stakeholders.
  4. Introduce and discuss the already put in place mechanisms for reducing disaster losses and risk management, focused on their region.
  5. Build a network among the participants by sharing the experience, existing know-how and team building.

STEP 3: The next step is to IDENTIFY specifics. Brainstorm and create a list. This is where we will write clear, precise statements detailing what the participants will actually be doing.

  • What specific, detailed knowledge, information, or skills do we expect participants to learn from the training?
  • What cross cutting issues need to be included and which ones to be prioritised (gender, environment, etc.)? For example: It is anticipated that participants who successfully complete the training will be able to:
  1. Acquire the conceptual basis to appreciate the complexities of vulnerability, risk and disaster risk management.
  2. Develop a better ability to engage with and relate to disaster professionals from various disciplines in a field situation.
  3. Increased ability to use tools and mechanisms to analyse hazards, vulnerability and capacities and acquire basic skills in risk identification and assessment.
  4. Identify strategies for building a disaster risk reduction capacity.
  5. Ability to advocate and promote DRR for government buy-in.

STEP 4: THINK about how participants can demonstrate their learning, i.e., exactly what they should be able to do. Brainstorm and generate a list of ideas for how participants can demonstrate what, how much, and how well they have learned.

 

Source: This information has been sourced from a great training development guide from: www.msb.se

 

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